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    Congratulations to Metropolitan Books’ Anand Gopal whose NO GOOD MEN AMONG THE LIVING has been longlisted for the 2014 National Book Award for Nonfiction! More info on all the contenders below.

    nationalbook:

    The 2014 National Book Award Longlist for Nonfiction is an eclectic selection of histories, philosophy, reportage, and a graphic memoir.

    • Roz ChastCan’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (Bloomsbury)

    • John DemosThe Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic
      (Alfred A. Knopf/ Random House)

    • Anand GopalNo Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes
      (Metropolitan Books/ Henry Holt and Company)

    • Nigel HamiltonThe Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941 - 1942 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

    • Walter IsaacsonThe Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution (Simon & Schuster)

    • John LahrTennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh (W.W. Norton & Company)

    • Evan OsnosAge of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China
      (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

    • Ronald C. RosbottomWhen Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944 
      (Little, Brown and Company/ Hachette Book Group)

    • Matthew StewartNature’s God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic (W.W. Norton & Company)

    • Edward O. WilsonThe Meaning of Human Existence 
      (Liveright Publishing Corporation/ W.W. Norton & Company)

    Posted September 17, 2014 at 3:48 pm  / Permalink  /  58 notes  /  Source: nationalbook

  1. It’s been quiet round these parts—August in book publishing—but we’re all still reading! A really nice video review of Mallory Ortberg's TEXTS FROM JANE EYRE is up today from bookriot's “In The Mailbag” above. “Anyone you know who is really into the classics and also has a sense of humor will appreciate this…It's just hilarious and perfect.” Thanks, guys!

    Also check out our new book page!

    Posted August 14, 2014 at 10:31 am  / Permalink  /  1 note  /  Source: youtube.com

  2. tessawegert:

Bill Gates: Six ‘Really Fantastic Books’ to Read This Summer. Yes to ”The Sixth Extinction” by Elizabeth Kolbert. Terrific mix of science and storytelling.

    tessawegert:

    Bill Gates: Six ‘Really Fantastic Books’ to Read This Summer. Yes to ”The Sixth Extinction” by Elizabeth Kolbert. Terrific mix of science and storytelling.

    Posted August 1, 2014 at 11:16 am  / Permalink  /  2 notes  /  Source: tessawegert

  3. flavorpill:

Scott Chershire Gives Us the Latest Great American Epic With ‘High as the Horses’ Bridles’ by Jason Diamond

The American epic comes in many forms, encompassing an Aaron Copland composition, Orson Welles’The Magnificent Ambersons or Paul Thomas Anderson’s There Will be Blood, or even walking through an art museum and falling into a trance looking at the paintings of Winslow Homer. We look, listen, or watch these works because they tell us what we long to know about ourselves as Americans; what’s wrong and what could be better. The characters might not find redemption, the colors the painter uses might not always portray a cheery future, and the stories might seem a little outlandish or even impossible, but there’s always the possibility of resolution, of hope.
Herman Melville understood this with his white whale; Theodore Dreiser did too. William Faulkner passed the idea down to Toni Morrison. James Baldwin saw it in the church, Cormac McCarthy in a dystopian future, Denis Johnson with CIA agents and solitary men of the Pacific Northwest, and Marilynne Robinson dealt with the women of Fingerbone, Idaho in Housekeeping. These authors have shown that the truly great American Epic is possible, but rare and profoundly special.

READ MORE on Flavorwire

    flavorpill:

    Scott Chershire Gives Us the Latest Great American Epic With ‘High as the Horses’ Bridles’ by Jason Diamond

    The American epic comes in many forms, encompassing an Aaron Copland composition, Orson Welles’The Magnificent Ambersons or Paul Thomas Anderson’s There Will be Blood, or even walking through an art museum and falling into a trance looking at the paintings of Winslow Homer. We look, listen, or watch these works because they tell us what we long to know about ourselves as Americans; what’s wrong and what could be better. The characters might not find redemption, the colors the painter uses might not always portray a cheery future, and the stories might seem a little outlandish or even impossible, but there’s always the possibility of resolution, of hope.

    Herman Melville understood this with his white whale; Theodore Dreiser did too. William Faulkner passed the idea down to Toni Morrison. James Baldwin saw it in the church, Cormac McCarthy in a dystopian future, Denis Johnson with CIA agents and solitary men of the Pacific Northwest, and Marilynne Robinson dealt with the women of Fingerbone, Idaho in Housekeeping. These authors have shown that the truly great American Epic is possible, but rare and profoundly special.

    READ MORE on Flavorwire

    Posted July 21, 2014 at 12:12 pm  / Permalink  /  35 notes  /  Source: flavorpill